Computers and Technology

What is the impact of scrolling on the user experience?

Trivial things can make a big difference in the user experience. Most of what we do on the Internet is done unknowingly. We vaguely look at the screen, visit websites and consume content.

Users do most of the things unknowingly, but websites need to be very aware of their behaviour. Websites must always be responsible for the needs and wants of every user. Professional custom web design company must leverage customer data and personas to create website tones and visual elements to best serve their target audience.

Screen scrolling is often underestimated, but it’s very important for UX. Learn how scrolling affects UX and be able to apply best practices to keep users on your site.

Does the user scroll?

In some parts of the web design industry, users are believed not to scroll. As a result, some responsive web design services providers prefer to split the page to display content to minimize scrolling. However, this is incorrect for the following two reasons.

Long content: Increasingly, long content is being adopted to enhance SEO. Reading through the five-page article can be a hassle, especially on mobile devices. Whether it’s an article, a manual, or a tutorial, it’s easy to leave the site if it’s too annoying to read.

leverage customer data

Touch screen: Mobile devices and touch panels are suitable for scrolling. Scrolling will become a more standard method of operation as these devices continue to dominate the market.

Also, the following marketer and researcher reports and surveys support the need for scroll-friendly web design.

Chartbeat, a data analytics service, analyzed visits to more than 2 billion websites and found that 66% of articles that caught the attention of visitors on a typical web page were Below the fold. I found that it is in the range of pages that cannot be seen).

According to an eye-tracking survey by usability guru Jakob Nielsen, users tend to focus on the first view, but they still scroll. I found that it is easy to scroll, especially on pages that are displayed to encourage scrolling.

Research Laboratory shows

On mobile sites, about half of users started scrolling within 10 seconds and 90% within 14 seconds.

A study by the Software Usability Research Laboratory shows that long pages that require scrolling are faster for users to read than pages that are split into several pages.

According to an eye-tracking survey conducted by CX Partners, users will want to scroll if designers follow a design technique that is suitable for scrolling.

To summarize the above findings, with proper design, users will scroll. But this time, the following questions arise.

How can I design a site that is appropriate for scrolling?

What are the best practices?

Importance of scanning and scrolling points

Humans are born to scan. Scanning requires less mental effort than reading every corner of an article, so I tend to scan sentences until I find something important. This rule doesn’t just apply to web design. For the same reason, supermarkets display expensive and popular items at eye level, with unbranded and low-priced items on the bottom shelf.

But in web design, scroll points interrupt the user’s scan. If you don’t put together the relevant information for each important point in the text, you’ll end up with a phenomenon called “scrolling fatigue.”

Scroll fatigue causes the following two phenomena.

The first is “Zombie Scroll”. It means that the user gradually loses concentration, becomes distracted, and becomes less responsive to common click baits, hooks, and CTA.

The second is ‘explosion of disappointment’ or ‘too long to read’. Users who are frustrated by long scrolls leave without understanding the point of the site and gaining any insight.

When designing your web page, consider the following tips and tricks to help your users read through while avoiding this negative impression.

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